PREFACE

 

by Swāmi Nikhilānanda

The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna is the English translation of the Sri Sri Rāmakrishna Kathāmrita, the conversations of Sri Ramakrishna with his disciples, devotees, and visitors, recorded by Mahendranāth Gupta, who wrote the book under the pseudonym of "M." The conversations in Bengali fill five volumes, the first of which was published in 1897 and the last shortly after M.'s death in 1932.  Sri Ramakrishna Math, Madras, has published in two volumes an English translation of selected chapters from the monumental Bengali work.  I have consulted these while preparing my translation.

M., one of the intimate disciples of Sri Ramakrishna, was present during all the conversations recorded in the main body of the book and noted them down in his diary.  They therefore have the value of almost stenographic records.  In Appendix A are given several conversations which took place in the absence of M., but of which he received a first-hand record from persons concerned.  The conversations will bring before the reader's mind an intimate picture of the Master's eventful life from March 1882 to April 24, 1886, only a few months before his passing away.  During this period he came in contact chiefly with English-educated Bengālis; from among them he selected his disciples and the bearers of his message, and with them he shared his rich spiritual experiences.

I have made a literal translation, omitting only a few pages of no particular interest to English-speaking readers.  Often literary grace has been sacrificed for the sake of literal translation.  No translation can do full justice to the original.  This difficulty is all the more felt in the present work, whose contents are of a deep mystical nature and describe the inner experiences of a great seer.  Human language is an altogether inadequate vehicle to express supersensuous perception.  Sri Ramakrishna was almost illiterate.  He never clothed his thoughts in formal language.  His words sought to convey his direct realization of Truth.  His conversation was in a village patois.  Therein lies its charm.  In order to explain to his listeners an abstruse philosophy, he, like Christ before him, used with telling effect homely parables and illustrations, culled from his observation of the daily life around him.

The reader will find mentioned in this work many visions and experiences that fall outside the ken of physical science and even psychology.  With the development of modern knowledge the border line between the natural and the supernatural is ever shifting its position.  Genuine mystical experiences are not as suspect now as they were half a century ago.  The words of Sri Ramakrishna have already exerted a tremendous influence in the land of his birth.  Savants of Europe have found in his words the ring of universal truth. 

But these words were not the product of intellectual cogitation; they were rooted in direct experience.  Hence, to students of religion, psychology, and physical science, these experiences of the Master are of immense value for the understanding of religious phenomena in general.  No doubt Sri Ramakrishna was a Hindu of the Hindus; yet his experiences transcended the limits of the dogmas and creeds of Hinduism.  Mystics of religions other than Hinduism will find in Sri Ramakrishna's experiences a corroboration of the experiences of their own prophets and seers.  And this is very important today for the resuscitation of religious values.  The sceptical reader may pass by the supernatural experiences; he will yet find in the book enough material to provoke his serious thought and solve many of his spiritual problems.

There are repetitions of teachings and parables in the book.  I have kept them purposely.  They have their charm and usefulness, repeated as they were in different settings.  Repetition is unavoidable in a work of this kind.  In the first place, different seekers come to a religious teacher with questions of more or less identical nature; hence the answers will be of more or less identical pattern.  Besides, religious teachers of all times and climes have tried, by means of repetition, to hammer truths into the stony soil of the recalcitrant human mind.  Finally, repetition does not seem tedious if the ideas repeated are dear to a man's heart.

I have thought it necessary to write a rather lengthy Introduction to the book.  In it I have given the biography of the Master, descriptions of people who came in contact with him, short explanations of several systems of Indian religious thought intimately connected with Sri Ramakrishna's life, and other relevant matters which, I hope, will enable the reader better to understand and appreciate the unusual contents of this book.  It is particularly important that the Western reader, unacquainted with Hindu religious thought, should first read carefully the introductory chapter, in order that he may fully enjoy these conversations.  Many Indian terms and names have been retained in the book for want of suitable English equivalents.  Their meaning is given either in the Glossary or in the foot-notes.  The Glossary also gives explanations of a number of expressions unfamiliar to Western readers.  The diacritical marks are explained under Notes on Pronunciation.

In the Introduction I have drawn much material from the Life of Sri Ramakrishna, published by the Advaita Ashrama, Māyāvati, India.  I have also consulted the excellent article on Sri Ramakrishna by Swami Nirvedānanda, in the second volume of the Cultural Heritage of India.

The book contains many songs sung either by the Master or by the devotees.  These form an important feature of the spiritual tradition of Bengal and were for the most part written by men of mystical experience.  For giving the songs their present form I am grateful to Mr.  John Moffitt, Jr.

In the preparation of this manuscript I have received ungrudging help from several friends.  Miss Margaret Woodrow Wilson and Mr.Joseph Campbell have worked hard in editing my translation.  Mrs.Elizabeth Davidson has typed, more than once, the entire manuscript and rendered other valuable help.  Mr.Aldous Huxley has laid me under a debt of gratitude by writing the Foreword.  I sincerely thank them all.

In the spiritual firmament Sri Ramakrishna is a waxing crescent.  Within one hundred years of his birth and fifty years of his death his message has spread across land and sea.  Romain Rolland has described him as the fulfilment of the spiritual aspirations of the three hundred millions of Hindus for the last two thousand years.  Mahatma Gandhi has written: "His life enables us to see God face to face.  .  .  .  Ramakrishna was a living embodiment of godliness." He is being recognized as a compeer of Krishna, Buddha, and Christ.

The life and teachings of Sri Ramakrishna have redirected the thoughts of the denationalized Hindus to the spiritual ideals of their forefathers.  During the latter part of the nineteenth century his was the time-honoured role of the Saviour of the Eternal Religion of the Hindus.  His teachings played an important part in liberalizing the minds of orthodox pundits and hermits.  Even now he is the silent force that is moulding the spiritual destiny of India.  His great disciple, Swami Vivekananda, was the first Hindu missionary to preach the message of Indian culture to the enlightened minds of Europe and America.  The full consequence of Swami Vivekānandā work is still in the womb of the future.

May this translation of the first book of its kind in the religious history of the world, being the record of the direct words of a prophet, help stricken humanity to come nearer to the Eternal Verity of life and remove dissension and quarrel from among the different faiths! May it enable seekers of Truth to grasp the subtle laws of the supersensuous realm, and unfold before man's restricted vision the spiritual foundation of the universe, the unity of existence, and the divinity of the soul!

- Swāmi Nikhilānanda

New York
Sri Ramakrishna's Birthday
February 1942

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